Schizophrenia is a mental illness in which people live in imaginary world as they hear voices, see images, imageries and feel that other persons are controlling their lives and thoughts. They get frightened and resort to erratic behaviour and find difficulties in managing day-to-day activities. The name schizophrenia and the misconceptions associated with are really confusing. Let us understand what incorrect information is buzzing around about schizophrenia and what actually the truth behind the condition is.

Myth 1: The person with schizophrenia has multiple personalities

This is often the most misunderstood concept about the condition as majority of the people are of the belief that individuals with schizophrenia have split personality – a person acts as if he or she is a two different persons.

Fact: A schizophrenic person does not have multiple personality disorder – rather the disorder is often unrelated to schizophrenia. Instead, the person develops false beliefs and conceptions and ideas that are not in accordance with reality.


Myth 2: Schizophrenics are dangerous or violent

It is often shown in the films and TV serials that a person with this disorder is a dangerous person with killing instincts, but reality is quite contrasting to this particular myth.

The fact is that schizophrenics are not dangerous or violent, but they can be, at times, unpredictable – particularly when they are being treated. If a schizophrenic resort to such a violent act then, it could be due to another cause, which would be related to a childhood problem pertaining to behaviour or substance abuse.


Myth 3: Schizophrenia develops due to bad parenting

This is absolutely wrong to believe that the condition may develop owing to bad parenting; and therefore, mothers should not be blamed for such a disorder.

The fact is that schizophrenia being a mental disorder can be due to mental trauma, injury, drug abuse and even genes as well.


Myth 4: Schizophrenia is hereditary

The common myth about schizophrenia is that if a mother or father has the condition, then their child would also get it too. Though genes play a role, but not prominent in this case, which means if one of the parents is suffering from this mental disorder, then it doesn’t mean that their child is destined to have this condition with high degree of probability. The risk associated with schizophrenia in an individual if one of his or her parents are schizophrenic is only about 10 percent and the risk increases if both the parents suffer from the condition.

Myth No. 5: Schizophrenics are not intelligent

Individuals suffering from this condition do face problems and find it difficult to perform well on tests, such as general aptitude, mental ability, cognitive abilities that require memory, attention, concentration and learning and implementing – yet it doesn’t mean that they are not smart. There are many people throughout the history who have had schizophrenia throughout their lives and yet performed outstandingly well and outsmart their counterparts. A few among them were even scientists, dancers and mathematicians.

Learn more about schizophrenia in our next article…